Home | Forums | Submit   Haiku Generator | Quotable JLG | The Icon Tarot 


Casual Code Sprint Yields Great Results

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Monday, 03 Aug, 2009 @ 7:53 AM
 
Haiku

Last week a number of the Haiku top developers got together for an informal code sprint.  They also decided that Haiku is pretty much ready for an Alpha release so we should expect that any day now.  You can read about all the details in this report from Stephan.



Haiku Webkit Port Not Complete But Patches Being Committed

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Friday, 17 Jul, 2009 @ 7:29 AM
 
Haiku

Ryan Leavengood has blogged about the progress being made on the Haiku Webkit port that he and GSoCer Maxime Simon are making.  With Haiku patches making it into the Webkit Repository, the community is that much closer to having its own native web browser.  The webkit is the foundation that a native Haiku web browser will be built on.  The progress made so far has put down a great foundation to build on.



Pimp Your Playstation

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Wednesday, 08 Jul, 2009 @ 9:20 AM
 
How To Groove

On the Playstation 3 and Playstation Portable, one can download and install themes to personalize their consoles.  If you want to show your love for Haiku but don’t have the time to build your own Haiku theme, you are in luck.  Long time community member Serpentor has put together some pretty nice looking themes for both the PSP and PS3 and they are available at his website.  It looks like you can head straight to the themes page with your PSP or PS3 and download the themes directly to your console for instant use.  We have tested the themes and like the clean look and feel of them.  Great job Serpentor!



More Fresh Developers For Haiku

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Sunday, 17 May, 2009 @ 8:01 AM
 
HaikuSoftware

The Haiku Code Drive for 2009 is on!  Haiku will sponsor the code drive and pay students $2500 to complete Haiku based projects.  These students and projects are in addition to those that are participating in the Google Summer of Code.  What does this mean for the Haiku community?  By the end of the summer, we will be much closer to the elusive Haiku R1 and may gain a couple new long-term developers.



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Bryce Groff

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Wednesday, 13 May, 2009 @ 10:04 PM
 
Haiku

Here’s another one of our interviews with the Haiku Google Summer of Code students, this time with Bryce Groff, who was one of the six who were selected for this years GSoC for Haiku.

Tell us about yourself
Sure. My name is Bryce Groff. I am finishing my undergraduate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Computer Science and minoring in Geography. I have had an interest in computers from an early age, and first started programming in basic. In high school I learned VB.Net and started to learn C. I really started to get into programming once I started college and have been working on learning new things since.

How did you hear of GSoC?
I have been following Haiku for a long time now and have seen the GSoC program through the Haiku web site. For the last two years I thought it would be an interesting program to be a part of and I felt confident that this year I was up to the task. So I submitted my application and the rest is history.

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?
I remember waiting for BeOS r5 when I was in eighth grade. When I finally got to download BeOS I was blown away by how simple and easy to use the operating system was and how well it ran on my computer at the time (I think it was a celeron). When Be went under I was sad that the operating system was going away. After a while I started to find bits of information about a new operating system called OpenBeOS and started to follow the project and have been watching it ever since. Its great to see Haiku in the state that it is, and it can only get better.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
Like I said I have been watching Haiku for a long time now. I think I found it through OSNews or possibly freeos.com.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
I used BeOS for a while back around 99-2000 and it was my operating system about half time.

Tell us about your selected project
My project is to finish the implementation of the disk_device system. Basically this means that at the end of the summer we should have a good interface for partition schemes and the Intel system in particular. This means that we should have a good partition tool that can create a new partition map on the disk.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?
I think that the organization did a good job of laying out what was expected. The community always seems to welcome people who want to help out with the project.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
No.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?
No, I think that everyone who has been involved has communicated well and has given updates promptly.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?
Haiku was the only project that I submitted an application to. I was interested in finishing the Cairo backend but they did not apply to the program this year.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
I think the more the merrier. It seems like everyone would like for the Code Drive to happen.

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?
Finding solutions to problems has always been fun for me. I have worked in construction and I draw a lot of parallels between programming and construction. In both fields you are given the basic tools and materials needed to finish the project. So when I decided to go to get a degree I thought that Computer Science would be a good field to get into. Not to mention that I have spent a large amount of time tinkering with computers.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
I enjoy working with C++ and C# at the moment. The University of Hawaii uses Java as its intro language and that was interesting for a couple of semesters as well. Most of my own projects use C or C++ though.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what
was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

I worked on adding a line number display to StyledEdit. You can take a look at ticket #2623 and see the patch. I did not have enough time to really make it as nice as it could have been and unfortunately was taken out of the tree :( . The code was nice to work with. The Haiku team really stresses code style, which has forced me to think about style a lot more in my own code. At the moment there are not open tickets I am working on, however I still would like to help with the Cairo backend.

Bryce



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Chico Chen

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Sunday, 10 May, 2009 @ 10:06 PM
 
Haiku

Here’s the third in our series of interviews with the students who applied for this year’s Google Summer of Code for Haiku, this time with Chico Chen.

Tell us about yourself
I am a first-year graduate student in Graduate University of
Chinese Academy of Sciences now. My Major is basic software and
Trusted Computing. I love writing some codes in my blog to remember or
to share. I can read, write and speak English correctly enough to
understand and be understood. I cooperate with others easily, also
have coordination skills, teamwork spirit. I am skilled in use of C,
Java, UML, especially C++.

How did you hear of GSoC?
from open source

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?
I don’t know much about the future of Haiku. But it is an interesting
project. The code is not complex and the lines of code is not huge.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
from GSoC

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
No

What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?
The media kit. No, just I don’t know much about media. The unknown
part is very interesting.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is there another area that interests you?
You can recommend me some areas, and then I decide to choose one of them or not.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?

No.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
The big problem is I should adjust to develop project in linux and
other os. I used xp and vs to develop projects in the past.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

Haiku should give some suggestion after someone committing his/her
project proposal.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?

the Database Module of scilab.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
Yes

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?

My major. And I find I am suit for this major.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
c++

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2322
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2117
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2413
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/3635
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2891
And I have opened many tickets.

some of code need to be reconstructed.
No other plan.



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Henri Vettenranta

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Thursday, 07 May, 2009 @ 8:21 AM
 
Haiku

Tell us about yourself

I’m Henri Vettenranta, a 20-year-old IT student at Tampere University of
Technology. I’ve been fiddling with computers for longer than I’ve even
had one at home, starting on the computers on my mother’s work place
when she had to work on some weekends.

How did you hear of GSoC?

I originally heard of GSoC years ago when it was first introduced, but
couldn’t apply back then because I was too young. This spring I saw the
announcement in the topic of #haiku again and decided to apply.

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?

I see Haiku as the continuation of BeOS, which is still ahead of other
operating systems in some ways, even though it hasn’t been developed in
nearly a decade. I’d also say Haiku will have the best support for
developing, supporting and running commercial, proprietary software
among the open-source desktop-oriented operating systems.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?

While trying out BeOS I was disappointed with what had happened to it
and Be, so I went looking for options. Haiku was already back then the
only alive project trying to reimplement the Be API, so I was naturally
quite interested in it.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?

Yes, although like probably many others, I only tried BeOS first-hand
years after the demise of Be. If I’m not completely mistaken it was
around when Haiku got a working app_server, so that would be early 2005.
I ran BeOS as my primary desktop operating systems for quite a few
months back then, but eventually switched to Ubuntu mostly due to lack
of recent Adobe Flash.

What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?

I applied to work on an application updater. It interests me because
there currently is nothing quite like that on any operating system: the
updaters in Windows and Mac OS X can only update first-party software,
and Linux package managers and the like aren’t really cut out for a
collection of software from several third-party suppliers, either.

Haiku’s attributes are also a neat way to implement such a system
without having to maintain a separate database of installed
applications: when you install an application, it will automatically be
picked up by the updater when it uses an index to find all the
applications on a system, and when you remove the application file, its
entry will of course be removed from the file system index. Much of the
metadata such as the installed version and the location where to look
for updates can also be neatly kept part of the application executable
as attributes.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is there another area that interests you?

The partition table editor sounded pretty interesting, but I see there’s
already someone working on that.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?

I can’t think of any improvements. The application template was good, it
quickly got you going with writing the application.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?

No, I don’t think so.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

No, no bigger flaws in how Haiku handled GSoC, and if there were smaller
ones, I’ve already forgotten them.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?

No, I only applied for Haiku

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?

Yes it does sound interesting.

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?

I’ve always been fascinated by computers, and it was nice to see my own
code running and doing things on the machine. I’m not sure if I’d call
myself a programmer, though, since I haven’t had time to do many bigger
things unfortunately.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?

As I said I haven’t had much time for programming, but from playing with
it a little, Python does seem nice. As far as I know, Bethon, the Python
bindings for the Be API, isn’t quite up to the task on current versions
of Haiku and Python, so for Haiku software the choice would be C++.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

Yes I did work on my own patch in #2389 to make an alternative
implementation to rename the title of a tab in the terminal application.
For the most part the code seemed quite easy to understand, even though
it was virtually uncommented. There were also some small style issues
like the header files having inconsistent indentation, but generally the
code seemed pretty good.

It was quite nice to work on that, I may look for other small items in
the future to work on as time permits.


Henri Vettenranta
HeTo



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Smita Vijayakumar

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Monday, 04 May, 2009 @ 11:21 AM
 
Haiku

Various BeOS/Haiku related news sites are going to be hosting interviews with some of the Google Summer of Code students who applied to work on Haiku. Here’s the interview we did with Smita Vijayakumar, who applied to work on adding IPv6 support to Haiku. Smita’s entry didn’t make the final six, but she’s hopeful that there might be another Haiku Code Drive this year.

How did you hear of GSoC?
Through a friend who worked for GSoC in 2008.


What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?

I liked the idea list, and the development work. I have had past experience working on similar features.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
Through the Google Summer of Code list of organizations.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
No


What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?

I applied to work on implementing IPv6 support for Haiku.
It specifically interested me since I have 4 years’ development experience on network stacks.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is
there another area that interests you?

I am open to good development opportunities that will involve learning for me.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community,
individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you
as an applying student?

For supplying patches, there should be a set of bugs assigned to applicants, and mentors should evaluate quality of patches for the same bug fixed.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
:) No. I personally did not fix a bug, since all bugs reported were application level bugs, and there was none which was a system-level bug.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people
involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

Better feedback on proposals will really help. I understand there are many applicants, but if there is something specific missing in a proposal, and is highlighted, that helps to improve future applications.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with
GSoC? If so which ones?

I applied to Google Chromium and Asterisk.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
Yes!

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?
I have always been passionate about programming, especially low-level programming, since it involves a lot of intricate logic and design.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
C/C++ programming.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what
was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to
try working on other open items?

Though I did not work on any ticket, I did write up a few lines of code to test my idea in the proposal. This code never did find its way onto the code branch.
I personally feel the system-level code (especially handling of ICMP and the division between network layers) can be more modularized. I found some functionalities to be spread out.; This increases the chances of bugs.



The Forums Are Back

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Friday, 01 May, 2009 @ 8:16 PM
 
Forums

After a little configuration snafu, we are happy to say that the BeGroovy forums are back and available for your enjoyment!



Six Students for Haiku via GSOC 2009

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Tuesday, 21 Apr, 2009 @ 8:43 AM
 
Haiku

Haiku will get the help of six students from the Google Summer of Code experience this year.  The students will be working on items from a native web browser for Haiku to porting Haiku over to the ARM process.  The ARM processor port is of GREAT interest to us here at BeGroovy because we see a huge potential for being one of the few operating systems that will be available for the next generation of ARM based netbooks coming out at the end of this year.  Please, welcome our energetic young developers to the Haiku community!  Read more over at the Haiku website.



Quick Catch-up

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Thursday, 02 Apr, 2009 @ 10:25 AM
 
Bits N

Just in case you have not been following the Haiku website or other community news sites, here is a quick recap of what has been happening lately.  Haiku now has native GCC 4.3.3 support.  Haiku was recently seen at FOSDEM 2009, SCaLE 2009, and Chemnitzer Linux-Tage.  The Haiku-OS website got an upgrade.  Haiku’s wireless stack is getting work done on it.  Finally, Haiku developers would like to see a native Haiku web browser and are looking for developers for the project.



Welcome 2009!

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Wednesday, 07 Jan, 2009 @ 2:46 PM
 
General News

We would like to wish everyone a Happy New Year! and apologize for the little hiccup in our service.  No, we are not ready to close up shop and we won’t be for quite a while… the last user has not left!



Haiku Alpha 1 Proposals are selected

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Tuesday, 23 Sep, 2008 @ 2:34 PM
 
Haiku

Voting has closed on the Haiku Alpha 1 Proposals and the results are in. Accepted were proposals to fix all known data corruption bugs, finish swap file support, fully integrate an I/O scheduler, fix up the ata driver to be able to set it as the default bus manager, and to create the much talked about gcc2/gcc4 hybrid. Rejected, and by rejected we just mean that it was not picked as a “blocker” for getting Alpha 1 released, were live updating, creating a welcome package, and adding a read-ahead feature. These could still be added if they are ready in time, but they aren’t to be a holdup on the release either. As for what software we’ll see in the Alpha, the development tools will come already installed (seeing as this release is aimed at getting developer interest this is a good thing), also to be included are Firefox (Bon Echo?), Vision, Wonderbrush (custom unlocked Haiku only verison), BePDF, CVS, Subversion, Pe, Yasm. Rejected was having a Webkit based browser, Git, and MDR with SSL. Again these could be added to the Alpha but are not to hold it up if they aren’t ready yet and everything else is. Also rejected was the package manager from TiltOS, “box”. This is a handy thing to have, without having anyone sign up for it to make sure it was ready for “prime-time” it got 0 votes.
The majority selected to have the Alpha available as a CD image, an image for emulators (vmware and QEMU perhaps others?), and an image for live USB flash devices.
A couple items tied and further discussion will be held on those items. Target release date for Haiku Alpha 1 is still a TBD, but it now appears it will be Real Soon Now.



HaikuPorts Gets New Home

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:scottmc on Thursday, 31 Jul, 2008 @ 3:57 PM
 
Haiku

The new HaikuPorts site is now up and running at: http://ports.haiku-files.org
If you’ve ever ported something over to BeOS they’d be happy to have extra hands helping out. Just contact Brecht to get added.
For many of the ports it’s just a matter of locating the source code, checking for prior BeOS workarounds and undoing them. In some cases, since Haiku is more POSIX compliant than BeOS, many workarounds are no longer required. They are logging what’s needed for each to get it to build, or in cases where they haven’t gotten something to build, they’ve left notes so the next attempt to port it will have a place to start. So far it’s mostly stuff that had at one time or another been ported to BeOS.



Icon Tarot Returns

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Deej on Tuesday, 22 Jul, 2008 @ 10:54 AM
 
BeDope

I was doing a little upkeep around the site and noticed that Icon Tarot section was no longer working. It’s fixed now. So all of you that have been wondering lost without BeDope’s tarot to guide you can have your decisions once again guided by its’ prophecies.



Web Tablets 8 years later…

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Deej on Tuesday, 22 Jul, 2008 @ 8:51 AM
 
Hardware

I got a real kick out of this post on /.:

“TechCrunch announced that they are planning to design their own $200 web tablet device. Quoting: ‘The idea is to turn it on, bypass any desktop interface, and go directly to Firefox running in a modified Kiosk mode that effectively turns the browser into the operating system for the device. Add Gears for offline syncing of Google docs, email, etc., and Skype for communication and you have a machine that will be almost as useful as a desktop but cheaper and more portable than any laptop or tablet PC.’ The aim is for the tablet to run on modified open source software, which will be released back to the community along with the specifications for the hardware.”

Sounds a lot like a Qubit BeIA tablet from about 8 years ago to me, sans the open source part. ;)



When R1 Arrives R2 Will Not Be Far Behind

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Thursday, 17 Jul, 2008 @ 6:42 PM
 
Haiku

As the incredible coders work towards that elusive R1 of Haiku, others are diligently working on some of the foundations of R1.  DarkWyrm has let out “a little secret” about what he is working on for R2 and you can find it here.  As excited as we are about Haiku R1, we here at BeGroovy are pretty excited about the prospects of R2 and beyond as well!



Haiku at LinuxWorld 2008

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Wednesday, 16 Jul, 2008 @ 9:20 AM
 
Haiku

With some fancy talking and some even fancier dancing, Haiku was made its way into LinuxWorld 2008 in San Francisco, CA.  This is a huge opportunity for the community to get the word out about Haiku.  Koki and Urias are looking for more folks to help them present at the Haiku booth Aug 4th-7th.  More information about the booth and a way to show your interest in helping out, read this article on the Haiku website.



Haiku Podcast #15 Now Online

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Wednesday, 09 Jul, 2008 @ 6:55 AM
 
Haiku

Sikosis has put together another excellent episode of the Haiku Podcast.  For those of you that like to listen to your Haiku news, head on over and download this month’s episode!



Another Web Browser for Haiku

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Yez on Monday, 23 Jun, 2008 @ 8:18 AM
 
General News

Choice is always a good thing. Soon, Haiku users will have at least two solid choices for web browsing. ICO was informed that there is a BeOS/Haiku port of NetSurf in the works. According to their site, “NetSurf is a free, open source web browser. It is written in C and released under the GNU Public Licence version 2. NetSurf has its own layout and rendering engine entirely written from scratch. It is small and capable of handling many of the web standards in use today.” That sounds great. For specific build instructions for Haiku, you can read over this page.



[powered by WordPress.]

Random Haiku:

No hourglass icon?
I never noticed before.
There are no delays.

Since 1998 - Until the Last User Leaves...
BeGroovy, established 1998

search BeGroovy:

BeGroovy Archives:

February 2017
S M T W T F S
« Jan    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728  

other:

19 queries. 0.059 seconds

[powered by WordPress.]