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Despite Rumors, Intel Webpad not using BeIA

Filed under the:  department.
Posted by:Ryan on Monday, 26 Feb, 2001 @ 12:49 AM
 
Submitted News

Ever since Intel announced their web tablet, there have been rumors that it would be running BeIA. Today Intel revealed some of the specifications for the webpad, including the operating system. They are not using BeIA, but rather windriver VxWorks. This will probably put the current batch of Intel rumors to rest. That said, Qubit and Sony both have great BeIA devices on the way, so Intel could end up being left out in the cold. What’s your take on this interesting non-event?



19 Responses to “Despite Rumors, Intel Webpad not using BeIA”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    Oh well…

    I’m surprised Intel is not using technology from a company it has invested in (either BeIA or Linux), and I’m disappointed that it’s not running BeIA, because I thought it looked like a pretty good webpad in the demo. It also would have been the biggest “name brand” to use BeIA in a webpad.

    That being said… these internet appliance arrangements can come and go. Who knows what Intel will be using in their webpads a year from now.

    I’m personally hoping Sony comes out with a bad-ass webpad running BeIA… that one with the streaming television video would be nice. :-)

  2. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 2:15:25 PM

    Strange … VxWorks vs. VxTel

    Strange that the VxWorks announcement comes on the same day as the Intel/VxTel announcement. As far as I can tell, VxTel is not related to VxWorks at all (which is owned by Wind River Systems).

    What the hell does Vx stand for?

  3. Anonymous Says:

    Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    So you can’t run BeOS/BeIA on it.

  4. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 2:26:25 PM

    Re: Strange … VxWorks vs. VxTel

    Usually “Vx” refers to a “Virtual Device-X”. Where “X” is the name of the device.

  5. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 2:44:43 PM

    Ahhh yes I didn’t think about that…

    And they more than likely chose StrongARM due to it’s low power usage.

    I wonder what OS Intel will start running on their appliances based on their upcoming “low-power” x86 chip? Hmmmm…….

  6. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 2:44:43 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    BeIA GREAT problem is that NOW is x86 only

    (yes PPC too the os .. probably not opera and so on)

  7. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 4:04:12 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    X86 is precisely the right place for BeIA. Internet appliances must be low cost and x86 has low cost and extensive development possibilities. Intels webpad is as much about demonstrating their StrongARM technology as it is about webpads. This product could have been out a lot sooner if they used an X86 platform. But now they have more tools and vendors experienced with their StrongARM technology so they are probably happy even though we are scratching our heads.

  8. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/27/2001 06:40:45 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    You’re a little confused; in the embedded space, x86 chips are expensive and generally use too much power and/or generate too much heat. PowerPC, StrongARM, Hitachi SuperH and MIPS all rock for embedded systems, x86 is actually a fairly small player.

    - chrish

  9. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/27/2001 09:45:00 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    The Geode is x86 and seems to be doing pretty well, though…

  10. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/27/2001 09:45:00 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    Geode x86 is doing well, and Crusoe x86 will probably do well, also. Intel will be coming out with their low-power x86 soon as well.

    What is creating this demand?

    IA’s that are compatible with popular desktop operating systems: Windows and Linux. This in turn opens things up for less well known OS’s like BeOS. Trying to compare the embedded market to the IA market is not going to work.

  11. FurryOne Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/27/2001 4:10:19 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    Unless something happens quickly to thwart their move into the cellular & PDA marketplace, I can see Microsoft squeezing the IA market from both ends, and crushing any competition. Let’s face it… if they can put their OS on a cellular, then a webpad is only a small jump away.

    While Be is waiting for the IA market to expand, MS plays it’s favorite game… field some feeble attempts at the market, let others take the big risks, then enter when the demand materializes and use your monopoly powers to get OEMs to switch to an MS solution.

  12. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To FurryOne @ 02/27/2001 6:01:51 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    Hmm, I heard something about a court case, some antitrust suit?? Not quite sure what it was about exactly… maybe you can check it out….

  13. FurryOne Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/27/2001 6:59:33 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    Yeah, I listeded to it live while I was working today… A bunch of “old Farts” who cared more about what was said by the trial judge than about the rest of the case… probably because they don’t have a clue about what MS did/does, and don’t intend to learn. “Who cares if the Palace burns to the ground, as long as we look good fighting the fire.” Pompous Asses, every one.

  14. stephenb Says:

    In Response To FurryOne @ 02/27/2001 6:01:51 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    The problem with Microsoft and appliances is that people who buy appliances generally expect said appliances to work.

    Consumers, as a group, tend to be much more forgiving of computers. Partly because they’re much more complicated than other consumer electronics, and partly because we’ve become trained to expect them to screw up.

    Can you imagine how pissed off Joe businessman would be if his cellphone starts blue screen’ing on him?

  15. FurryOne Says:

    In Response To stephenb @ 02/28/2001 02:24:22 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    >Can you imagine how pissed off Joe businessman would be if his cellphone starts blue screen’ing on him?

    Most people write-off lock-ups and errors to the complexity of today’s technology rather than to any programming error. It’s the joke of the day. You or I would point to MS as the problem, but the average person would just blame technology as a whole. Just look how many people think MS did nothing wrong…

  16. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To stephenb @ 02/28/2001 02:24:22 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    I doubt it would blue screen.

    Not that I am in ANY way a fan of M$, but the simplicity of known hardware greatly simplifies the job or writing the OS. The only comparison would be, what Windows did on a 220MHz/32MB webpad, BeOS could take on with a 133MHz/8MB pad, and the UI would still be responsive. Oh.. and the price difference to the OEM would likely be substantial.

  17. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/28/2001 1:54:16 PM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    As well as how much better Be is at handling multimedia in the core OS.

  18. eLarson Says:

    In Response To Anonymous @ 02/26/2001 2:26:25 PM

    Re: Strange … VxWorks vs. VxTel

    While taking a course in VxWorks from Windriver, the trainer facetiously said that it was short for ‘VRTX’… as in ‘VRTX Works’.

    VRTX is another RTOS from another vendor. (It stands for Versatile Real Time eXecutive, in case that question was coming next. :)

    Well okay… so it wasn’t ‘ha ha’ funny. :)
    Erik

  19. eLarson Says:

    In Response To FurryOne @ 02/28/2001 08:33:00 AM

    Re: Intel webpad is based on StrongARM chip

    This is pretty true. Case in point: I once put up a string of Christmas lights that flash in pre-programmed patterns — chasing, all-red-then-all-blue-then… and so on. Well I came home one night and discovered that they were stuck in the ‘all red’ state… and just wouldn’t change. So I unplugged it and plugged it back in.

    There.

    I rebooted my Christmas lights after an apparent ‘firmware’ crash. It didn’t bother me terribly much at the time, but if they do start marketing HA lights, I’d think about it. :)

    eLarson

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