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Scot Hacker Interviewed at Homenetappliance.com

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Posted by:Ryan on Friday, 22 Dec, 2000 @ 12:49 AM
 
Submitted News

Several readers pointed out that homenetappliance.com is running an interview with Scot Hacker covering BeOS, BeIA, RipEnc, Adamation and more. It’s a good read. Check it out….



61 Responses to “Scot Hacker Interviewed at Homenetappliance.com”

  1. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    He doesn’t want a webpad?

    Scot, how can you possibly not want a webpad? Do you read newspapers and magazines? Do you read websites a lot? Do you read a lot of email? Do you like to listen and watch MP3’s and video news streams?

    Now realize you can do all of these things from anywhere 200 feet away from your hub, laying in bed, sitting on the porch, in the bathroom, in the kitchen, in a lawnchair, and you’re not constrained to sitting in front of your computer.

    Gee, you’re right, who’d ever want a webpad! =)

  2. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/22/2000 1:07:22 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    “Scot, how can you possibly not want a webpad? Do you read newspapers and magazines?”

    Yes, a lot of them. It’s very refreshing to get away from a computer screen and hold paper in my hand. The user interface of the magazine is nearly perfect.

    ” Do you read websites a lot?”

    Yes. All day every day. Like I said, this is why I want to get away from computer and the web when work is through. I need less digital stuff in my life, not more. I need more time for biking and snowboarding and going to movies and reading books. Not less. This is SO important… that people recognize the scariness of the way digital everything is creeping into every aspect of our lives.

    ” Do you read a lot of email? Do you like to listen and watch MP3’s and video news streams? ”

    Yes, see above. I do that all day every day, and want to get away from that in my “down time”. Know when to walk away from the computer to go have a life. And know when to run ;)

    “Now realize you can do all of these things from anywhere 200 feet away from your hub, laying in bed, sitting on the porch, in the bathroom, in the kitchen, in a lawnchair, and you’re not constrained to sitting in front of your computer.”

    I must confess that I’ve recently started reading news on the toilet through my Visor with AvantGo. And I like it. And this frightens me. I will maintain my vigilance against creeping digitalitis.

  3. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 2:48:31 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    I need more time for biking and snowboarding and going to movies and reading books. Not less.

    Who said webpads are going to take away your time? All I’m saying is when you read websites and email, you can either be chained to your desk, or you can do it in a comfortable spot around your house (and soon, anywhere). You could bike and skii *MORE* with a wireless webpad. Check your email during a break from biking, answer emails and catch up on news from a nice skii resort.

    This is SO important… that people recognize the scariness of the way digital everything is creeping into every aspect of our lives.

    Man, you are the last person on earth I would have suspected to be paranoid like this. Digital, wireless devices can free you from the chains of a single place. They can make your life easier if you let them. Or you can be afraid of them, and stay chained to your desk.

    I must confess that I’ve recently started reading news on the toilet through my Visor with AvantGo. And I like it. And this frightens me. I will maintain my vigilance against creeping digitalitis.

    I need more time for … reading books.

    Me too, and I can’t wait until I have access to all my books from one location — my webpad. And when I come across a strange word, I highlight it and find the definition. I make notes in my books. I read news sites that are up-to-date, not printed last night like the newspaper.

    Five years from now when my webpad is as thick as a sheet of paper, I roll it up and stick it in my pocket, and work/play from ANYWHERE in the world with my wireless, high-speed satellite connection.

    I guess I’ll know where to find you… half the day at home working from your desk?

  4. rgering Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 2:48:31 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    I hear ya man…it is nice to get some air now and then and get out into the light. I work with computers all the time, but I really like to get away from them sometimes.
    ‘RobG’

    Remember to read “The ‘Any’ Key”!

  5. wobegon Says:

    BeOS love it or leave it.

    When I first heard about BeIA I freaked.I thought it would never work and who the hell needs a webpad anyway.I’m over that and I now see that this would not only be a great idea it’s probably where the whole industry is heading.
    your main source of computing will be done either on a webpad or like device or a desktop peobably not both.it’s your choice.People like Scott Hacker, Eugina Loli ( who runs around forums proclaiming BeOS is dead )former BeOS developers that close thier doors and bitch about lack of support ect, really piss me off to no end.I really think Be will succede in bring to the world an alternate to windows and Linux, and that it will be very profitable for them.

  6. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To wobegon @ 12/22/2000 4:07:13 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    You don’t seem to understand. I am not a naysayer. I do think Be will do brilliantly with their BeIA strategy.

    There is a huge difference between what I want or don’t want in my personal life and what I think the public will want.

    Just because I’m not interested in having a Clipper or a Qubit doesn’t mean that millions of people won’t. And like I said, I’m dying to have an Aura-based device. And who knows what other compelling things Be will come up with? Again, I’m into anything that’s compelling *to me*. Qubits and Clippers aren’t compelling *to me*.

    Now please return to your regularly scheduled bickering about who has allegedly “turned” on Be.

  7. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/22/2000 3:16:23 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    “You could bike and skii *MORE* with a wireless webpad. Check your email during a break from biking, answer emails and catch up on news from a nice skii resort.”

    It’s a nice thought, but it misses the point. When people are taking cell phones or laptops or wireless web pads along with them on their holidays or outdoor experiences, there is a problem.

    You think you’re going to get more free time. In reality, you have less, because you make yourself available to do work — or to be tempted into during work — during your supposed leisure time.

    Believe me, I know. My emergence from that particular disease has been difficult and deliberate.

  8. mr_skreet Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 6:00:46 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    I agree wholeheartedly. Behind all the mobiles, Palms, automobiles, subsidised internet connections etc that The Company gives out is a thinly disguised motive. Whereas it used to be the case that after your 40 hours you were free to do as you wished, you are now expected to be at their beck and call in the 24 hour New Economy. You really must learn to walk away, like I’m doing now……………:)

  9. wobegon Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 5:50:25 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    your response to my post was a great deal more clear about your feelings towords Be and BeOS/BeIA than the interview was.
    I got the impression that you were kind of saying Be is compleatly wasting thier time with BeIA.
    I missunderstood and I officaly take you off my list of enemies of Be.

  10. Big Al Says:

    In Response To wobegon @ 12/22/2000 8:36:43 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    I’m guessing you don’t really consider these people enemies, but keep in mind that people like Eugenia still use BeOS and Eugenia in particular still submits (rarely) ports to BeBits. She’s been overboard in the past, but she’s still with us an a *very* valuable member of the community.

    Remember, this isn’t a religion and there aren’t martyrs or enemies of the state here. There are people that get frustrated at times. Nothing more, nothing less.

  11. wobegon Says:

    In Response To Big Al @ 12/22/2000 8:43:37 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    I only use the word “enemies” jokingly.
    Just this week BeForever ( that’s http://www.beforever.com/ ) pointed out that in a mac discusion group thread BeOS users and Mac users were going at each other.
    In that thread Eugina clearly states quote “BeOS is dead”
    unquote and then points out the merits of the upcoming Mac os/x.
    statements like that aren’t just “overboard” and she clearly isn’t just frustrated it sounds like she’s left for good.
    This is the prime source of my paranoia, former members, developers ( like wildcard design ) ect, all very valuable members of the community, leaving the community and pissing all over us as they go out the door.

  12. WattsM Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 5:50:25 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    I’ve officially turned on Be! Well, not really. (I confess I’m running FreeBSD 4.2 at this moment, but BeOS 5 Pro is still my main PC operating system. With Opera up and relatively happy, I have very little reason to be in BSD except when I’m, well, wanting to learn more BSD.)

    Personally I don’t think WebPads are going to be where it’s “at.” First off, I just don’t think they’re going to appeal to technophobes. For technophiles, what do they bring? The battery life and size of a laptop, combined with the functionality of a… widescreen Visor Deluxe. Sure, some people will think that’s swell, but if I’m going to carry around something that big I want it to be something I can run a word processor on, too. And if I’m going out hiking, I don’t really give a damn about websurfing. (The only electronic thing I might want would be a GPS.) Is there a market for WebPads? Probably, but I think it’s going to be a limited one. And if someone gets a laptop out for $150 more than a WebPad, sorry–kiss it goodbye.

    But, I’m interested in Aura, and more broadly in what it represents. My background, such as it is, is in telecommunications. Out of all the companies farting around in the potential IA space, Be is the only one–at least publicly–who seems to understand just what the implications of the convergent broadband network are.

    As for BeOS being dead–it depends on your measure of life, I suppose. At this point I remain unconvinced that Be had to torpedo the desktop in order to launch the appliance. I don’t know if the user community can build up what’s been lost (essentially, corporate developer support for the OS); doing that took Linux many years, and as much as Be fans tend to twitch at the comparison, BeOS on the desktop is very much where Linux was five years ago–i.e., beloved by hackers and geeks who see the amazing potential in it, but utterly off the radar to everyone else.

    I’d call BeOS… undead. It’s still around, still has a cult following, is still being developed–but there’s no real momentum to it right now and it’s unclear whether any momentum is going to develop in the future. And as long as that remains cloudy there [i]won’t[/i] be any companies willing to bet serious development dollars–let alone their existence–on it.

    Yet, this doesn’t make it vanish from my hard drive, doesn’t make the programs I’m using now stop working, and doesn’t mean there’s no potential for neat things to happen in the future. Salon’s Andrew Leonard wrote his “Santa’s wish list” for the tech field: he asked for, among other things, an OS that boots up in seconds rather than minutes, solid reliability, and a mail client that lets him handle lots of messages relatively painlessly. For better or worse, I’ve already found all of those–even the mail client, and much of its power comes from Be’s database-ish file system. (Ask any of your friends if they can find all mail sent in the last two months from their boss, across all their mail folders, in a few seconds. Ask any survivors to try again… without loading their mail program.)

  13. jairhart Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 6:00:46 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    Scot, I completely agree with you in that we might begin to have technology surrounding us no matter where we are. But I think you’re forgetting the best feature on an IA device: an off button. If you don’t want to listen to mp3s when going bike riding, turn it off. Just because you have an ego boosting toy doesn’t mean that it has to take over your life. If you can control your urges to surf the internet (at 640×480) while in the bathroom, good for you. If not, at least you’ll have a nice BeIA sound system. :)

  14. mr_skreet Says:

    In Response To wobegon @ 12/22/2000 9:12:25 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Yes, Eugenia’s regular repetitive assertions that the
    BeOS is dead certainly don’t endear her to those of us who still see signs of life there. She certainly has managed to do quite a lot of damage IMO. But then you can never be too sure about which way she’s going to go. Only a few weeks ago she publicly stated that she was deleting BeOS from her hard drive. Shortly afterwards she starts releasing ports, starts contributing stories to BeNews and participating in news groups. Not very consistent behaviour.
    As for other developers, you are absolutely off the mark having a go at wc design. Severe financial/legal problems and having a new family to care for were behind that, and I thought the way they bowed out was utterly professional. They absolutley didn’t piss on us. Certainly some devlopers have been very much the opposite, but then many of them felt pissed over by Be, and with good reason. There were many good products ready to ship, and at the last moment the rug was pulled out from under them. Whilst the focus shift was necessary, it was very poorly handled indeed, and Be lost some valuable allies (as well as staff) as a result. Considering the time, effort and personal funds that many had invested, their emotiveness is understandable, even if often badly expressed.

  15. Ores Says:

    In Response To wobegon @ 12/22/2000 9:12:25 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    If you really think that is their stand point, then why not join them and leave. cause it is quite clear that while they are frustrated, they realise why Be as done what it has had to do, and though not happy about it, i think you will find they understand. Eugina still contributes a lot to the BeOS community, and deserves respect for what she has done in the past, even if her view on BeOS is not as positive as the rest of us

  16. moooooooo Says:

    don’t care about Java?

    “but I don’t care a bit about Java”

    i have to totally disagree with that comment. java will bring over a lot more than just the vm and the compiler.
    regards
    peter

  17. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 6:00:46 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    It’s a nice thought, but it misses the point. When people are taking cell phones or laptops or wireless web pads along with them on their holidays or outdoor experiences, there is a problem.

    You think you’re going to get more free time. In reality, you have less, because you make yourself available to do work — or to be tempted into during work — during your supposed leisure time.

    Scot, you are not listening to what I am saying. I am not saying bring your webpad with you after work. I am saying, an internet appliance can free you up to work from anywhere (and thus play from anywhere).

    I am a classic romantic. I love nature. I can think of nothing better than to do my work in the great outdoors, and when I am finished, I put the device down and do something else outdoors.

    You sound like a drug addict. “But if a joint is sitting there, I have to smoke it!” Why?

  18. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    In Response To WattsM @ 12/22/2000 9:42:19 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Personally I don’t think WebPads are going to be where it’s “at.”

    Yeah really. I mean, who would want to surf from anywhere rather than being tied to their PC? Reading a book in bed or NYTimes.com. Reading the latest USAToday.com stories while eating breakfast. Controlling my entertainment center with a webpad like a smart remote control. Sitting on the couch watching a basketball game while having the complete and total stats at my fingertips from ESPN.com.

    You’re right, there’s no market for that.

    First off, I just don’t think they’re going to appeal to technophobes.

    How could they not? They’re going to be easy to use, wireless devices with touch screens. It doesn’t get any easier.

    For technophiles, what do they bring? The battery life and size of a laptop, combined with the functionality of a… widescreen Visor Deluxe.

    No, I’m sorry, when you have something with the screen the size of a laptop, you get WAY more functionality than a Visor Deluxe. Not to mention this visor deluxe has a high-speed wireless connection in your house (and eventually, everywhere).

    Sure, some people will think that’s swell, but if I’m going to carry around something that big I want it to be something I can run a word processor on, too.

    Fine, get a Microsoft TabletPC. But I don’t know what you mean by “that big.” It’s the size of a thick magazine, and nowhere near as heavy as a laptop. When you pick up a copy of Wired, do you often think, “if I’m going to carry around something this big I want it to run a word processor”?!

    And if I’m going out hiking, I don’t really give a damn about websurfing.

    Good for you. You pulled one particular quote out from my discussion with Scot. I don’t believe anyone would suggest hiking with a webpad as THE PRIMARY USE of a webpad. But if you have to choose between staying and home and getting caught up with work, or leaving to go hiking, and doing your work outdoors, which would you rather? Me, it would be the latter.

    Is there a market for WebPads? Probably, but I think it’s going to be a limited one. And if someone gets a laptop out for $150 more than a WebPad, sorry–kiss it goodbye.

    Yeah right. So what you’re saying is, someone is going to add a DVD-ROM/CD-ROM, big hard drive, faster processor, more memory, etc for $150 more than a webpad (which will probably be around $500 at first, and on down as LCD’s/flash gets cheaper). Good luck.

    Aside from that, I don’t WANT a laptop to carry around. It’s cumbersome. I want something I can lay back with and enjoy like a good book. Something light and easy to wield. Not a laptop.

  19. chuck Says:

    In Response To Ores @ 12/23/2000 07:31:43 AM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Exactly. It should be evident to everyone Eugenia invested much of herself in the BeOS community. The events of the last few months were difficult for all of us - moreso for Eugenia and others who were heavily involved in the community.

    I personally am grateful for what she’s done (and continues to do) for the community.

  20. mario Says:

    I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    So, Personal Stdio 2.0 for BeOS will be released sometimes after the Windows version.

    And so it goes.

  21. georges Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 11:18:03 AM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    The most important words are “will be relased”.
    It is coming, so quit yer bitching.

    georges

  22. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/23/2000 10:11:04 AM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    I sound like a drug addict? WTF??? Just because I personally don’t like the direction we seem to be heading, where digital everything injects itself into every little aspect of our lives, you interpret that as me saying that I don’t think I can have a gizmo without using it all the time?

    Of course I know how to turn a device off. I have a cell phone that I rarely bring with me, for the same reason. I don’t feel compelled to have it with me at all times.

    I don’t understand why this is so hard to communicate. I say “These devices don’t interest me and I can’t think of a *good* reason why I might want to own one” and you guys act like I’m crazy, or like I have an addictive personality, or like I don’t understand “what they could do to make my life better” …

    Why is this so hard? If you like the idea of a portable internet terminal, then get one. You take my personal opinion and preference as if I were trying to stab Be in the back or something.

    And again, it’s entirely possible that Be will come out with more ideas or platforms that *will* seem interesting and useful to me.

  23. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/23/2000 10:24:01 AM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    “Yeah really. I mean, who would want to surf from anywhere rather than being tied to their PC?”

    I’d rather be tied to the PC. Is it really that important to be wired to the net at all times that you want the capability even when you’re not at your PC? The answer may be yes for you. For me, it’s a definitive NO!

    “Reading a book in bed or NYTimes.com. Reading the latest USAToday.com stories while eating breakfast.”

    Ewww. Wouldn’t you rather have a newspaper in your hand? I know the whole idea of e-books appeals to some people. It does not appeal to me at all. Yes, I like the idea of mass etext storage and searchability. But I do NOT have any desire to give up on real books, newspaper, and magazines.

    “Controlling my entertainment center with a webpad like a smart remote control.”

    I presume that my entertainment center will have its own remote control.

    “Sitting on the couch watching a basketball game while having the complete and total stats at my fingertips from ESPN.com. ”

    You really want more stats than they give you on TV?

    All of this strikes me as information gluttony.

    I see the utility of the Qubit in the hands of a doctor roaming the hospital floor, or an insurance adjuster making the rounds, etc. But certainly not as something I could use in my personal life.

  24. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To moooooooo @ 12/23/2000 08:05:52 AM

    Re: don’t care about Java?

    Yes, Java support will bring more users and developers, and I care about it for that reason. But I don’t tend to visit web sites that have Java, so I’ve never missed it in BeOS.

    Not that I would mind having it. Just that on my list of BeOS priorities, Java is much lower than other technologies.

  25. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 11:18:03 AM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    Why would this make you disappointed? Adamation has always been there for Be, has spent many years developing cool BeOS software, has been stymied by the lack of services in BeOS for sophisticated media apps (e.g. drivers for the high end video hardware a media app needs in order to be taken seriously), and has sunk untold amounts of money into the platform.

    And now you’re disappointed that Adamation wants to make a bit of money, expand our userbase, and do a cross-platform application?

    What exactly is it about this scenario that you find disappointing?

  26. mario Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:13:45 PM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    OK, bad wording: I should have said that I am paranoid about this.
    First I thought Adamation will be BeOS-only.
    Then HP came, and I thought they will release PerS. for BeOS and Windows at the same time.
    Now I hear the BeOS version will be delayed.

    If it wasn’t for you working for Adamation, I would
    already consider PerS. 2.0 for BeOS doomed.

    But I guess your post means my fears are unfounded.

  27. mario Says:

    In Response To georges @ 12/23/2000 11:36:42 AM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    OK, OK, … already silent! Jeeeeeeez!!!

  28. gmlongo Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:09:13 PM

    Re: don’t care about Java?

    As you know, Java is not only used for websites. The addition of Java would bring many different applications to BeOS. Granted, these apps are slow, Java apps…but they are still apps.

    -G

  29. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 1:50:09 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    Scot, you reap what you sow.

    You are, through your own hard work, a spokesperson and highly visible BeOS/BeIA advocate. Therefore, when you come out and say you don’t see why you’d want a webpad and you are afraid of digitalitis, be prepared for people like me to get pissed off. You’re wielding a lot of power as an author and Be columnist writer.

    You’re welcome to your opinion, just realize it effects more people than you think.

    And the reason I kept arguing this point is because your reasoning for not wanting a webpad doesn’t make sense. If you don’t want a webpad because you are afraid of these digital devices, fine. But to say you don’t want a webpad because it will somehow take away your free time, well that’s just a lame argument… and that’s how I arrived at the drug-addict analogy.

  30. IAmWhoIHam Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:05:29 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    I’d rather be tied to the PC. Is it really that important to be wired to the net at all times that you want the capability even when you’re not at your PC? The answer may be yes for you. For me, it’s a definitive NO!

    Scot, you may be a good writer, but you’re terrible at debating a point. You entirely twist my words. I never said I want to work at a PC all day, and then have a webpad with me the rest of the time.

    It’s real simple. I don’t want to be tied to a PC at all! I don’t want to use a PC if I can avoid it. I want to be away from my PC as much as possible. This means the ideal solution is an untethered device — a webpad.

    Ewww. Wouldn’t you rather have a newspaper in your hand? I know the whole idea of e-books appeals to some people. It does not appeal to me at all. Yes, I like the idea of mass etext storage and searchability. But I do NOT have any desire to give up on real books, newspaper, and magazines.

    No, I’d rather have a current news resource rather than a day-old newspaper. I’d rather have an e-book that remembers what page I was last on, glows in the dark, includes cross-linked references, and “magazines” with audio/video not just pictures and text. In other words, the best of the digital and analog worlds combined (usability content).

    Not to mention having everything in one re-usable device, rather than dozens of paper products that have to be sorted, thrown away, organized, recycled, etc. And then you factor in the extra uses for webpads — I can’t wait to have full stats to the NBA and NFL games I’m watching at my fingertips, interactive TV programs will be cool, too.

    I presume that my entertainment center will have its own remote control.

    Scot, try to think outside the box.

    I have 5 remotes for my entertainment console. Yes, I have a universal remote, but it does not work well for everything. A webpad could easily offer complex controls in one-touch scenarios.

    Push the “Watch DVD” button, my receiver goes to Dolby Digital, my TV goes to S-Video, my DVD player turns on, and the DVD starts playing. I pushed one button. Push the TV button, the receiver changes to TV audio mode, the channel is changed, the cable box turns on, etc. Listen to a CD, same thing. The geeks could even hook up X10 functionality (dim the lights when watching a DVD).

    It’s all about making things simpler. Giving you more time to do what you want to do. My parents have a hard time setting things up to watch a DVD with all the buttons on the entertainment center. My mom is anti-geek. If she had a webpad by the couch for surfing, she could use it as a smart remote. They already have these remotes, but it it’s $300 for just a remote. This functionality could exist in the webpads by adding some infrared technology (and I know some of them are doing that).

    You really want more stats than they give you on TV?

    It’s not that I want MORE stats, it’s that I want CERTAIN stats WHEN I want them. I am watching the Orlando Magic, and I want to see what the hell Tracy McGrady has done tonight. Oh, he’s made 5/8 shots inside near the basket. Darrell Armstrong has made only 1/5 from the three point line tonight. etc. The possibilities are limitless. This was just one example.

    I see the utility of the Qubit in the hands of a doctor roaming the hospital floor, or an insurance adjuster making the rounds, etc. But certainly not as something I could use in my personal life.

    How amazingly short-sighted! I’m surprised. You sound like the guys at IBM a couple decades ago.

    “Who would possibly want a computer at home!”

  31. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/23/2000 5:30:10 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    I have a reputation as a BeOS cheerleader because that’s what I usually do. But that doesn’t mean I’m somehow obliged to act excited about everything Be does. If you see me as a sort of pundit/analyst, that’s fine, but a pundit/analyst who only sees the good in the doings of any particular company is going to be seen as hopelessly biased.

    If my opinion encourages people to have less gadget lust, to leave their laptops, cell phones, and web pads at home, and above all to not feel like they have to be connected at all times, then that’s a *good* thing, not a bad thing.

    My arguments against these sorts of things are many. The free time argument (which is absolutely *not* a lame argument) was just one element of the larger discussion we’re having here.

    Here’s where the slippage is: Marketing departments want you to believe that this gadget or that will liberate you. And people tend to believe that that’s true, with or without the help of marketing departments. But when you put a modem on your Pilot, you liberate yourself from cables while deepening your enslavement to technology and the internet. The real liberation (for me) has been the ongoing process of figuring out how to have less technology in my life, not more.

  32. mario Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/23/2000 5:42:13 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    “I see the utility of the Qubit in the hands of a doctor roaming the hospital floor, or an insurance adjuster
    making the rounds, etc. But certainly not as something I could use in my personal life.

    How amazingly short-sighted! I’m surprised. You sound like the guys at IBM a couple decades ago. ”

    Wait a minute… that’s just hs personal opinion and his personal wishes for his perosnal life. He didn’t make any long-term predictions on how the IAs will evolve.
    He didn’t say you or me won’t need or want IAs, he just said he doesn’t!

    I think both Scot and you have reasonable points.

  33. grovel Says:

    In Response To WattsM @ 12/22/2000 9:42:19 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    “but if I’m going to carry around something that big I want it to be something I can run a word processor on, too”

    Ah, but that’t the trick, isn’t it? You *will* be able to run a word processor on it. It will be remote- run via the browser. And that goes for many, many apps that you are used to using on your systems now.

    Personally, I think this system has flaws (e.g., storing files remotely? printing?), but nothing that can’t be overcome with clever engineering (e.g., Networked/USB hard drive. Networked/USB printer.). I personally look forward to the day when I can pick up a device the size of your average computer magazine and proceed to do all of the things that I would normally do on my computer (except perhaps play games, but that isn’t the purpose of the device anyhow).

    Just a thought or three.

    Cheers,
    grovel

  34. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 6:28:27 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    “He didn’t say you or me won’t need or want IAs, he just said he doesn’t! ”

    Exactly. In case I haven’t been clear enough, let me say it once more for the record:

    I have great faith in Be’s current direction. I think they’re doing the right thing for the company. They’re extremely well positioned. There are going to be millions of these devices and Be is better suited for almost all implementations than their competitors are. The strategy is brilliant, the economic possibilities are ripe, and Be is backing up their strategy with additional services, like MAP, which make it all the richer. There is no question in my mind that the IA strategy is going to be economically viable for them, and that BeOS would not have been.

    Of course, my selfish side still wishes Be was all about BeOS, because I care about it, whereas I don’t care much about BeIA.

  35. Scot Hacker Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 2:39:06 PM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    “Now I hear the BeOS version will be delayed.”

    I wouldn’t say delayed, as Adamation never projected a release date for pS 2.0. Adamation’s stance on the BeOS version of pS has been posted on their web site for a couple of months:

    http://www.adamation.com/Support/pSFAQ/archive/faq0055.html

    I believe this even showed up on BeNews a month or two ago.

  36. moooooooo Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:09:13 PM

    Re: don’t care about Java?

    i see your point. sometimes the written word doesnt convey what the person meant. i think though that java (and i mean Suns Java) on BeOS will truly show the world how good BeOS is. Not that us BeOS fans need showing :)
    have a great christmas break. and scot thanks for continuing your BeOS articles. they are a refreshing read
    cheers
    peter

  37. CJ Says:

    combining work and play

    I agree that there is a healthy separation between work and play but web pads can make the transition from one job to the ‘other’ easier - thus saving time. I asked a group of people on my email list a hypothetical question one time: “what will the world be like when you can talk to anyone, anywhere, anytime?” My brother replied, ‘BORG.’ My wisened uncle replied, ‘Hush.’

  38. DrB Says:

    why is everyone so updset?

    So scot thinks that be probably won’t buy an IA (except for Aura). So what? He’s entitled to his opinion.

    If he does not buy one, at least I will. That makes 50% average of the married technophiles.

    I happen to think I will buy one because having wireless access to the web while walking around my house would be cool. I would get wireless in my truck if I could, but the Ricochet service does not quite hit where I live in Jersey.

    Iamwhoiham is an ardent evangelist of BeIA (and IAs in general it seems). He (or she) will probably buy one. That makes 66% (but I don’t know if he or she is married :) heheh).

    But, Iamwhoiham, although I am rarely without my cell, laptop, and palm, sometimes the best place for ME to do work is right in front of my PC in my office. Wireless IAs will not unchain me from my desk, they will provide me with a longer chain. I have done work in restaurants, libraries, and museums, because I felt like a change of scenery, but all I needed to do was pick up my laptop and go.

    How could anyone NOT want a belly button ring? I have one because they look cool! I bet Scot Hacker has one…

  39. Scot Hacker Says:

    I embody contradictions

    This has been an interesting discussion, and has gotten me thinking about this stuff in ways that I haven’t before. As the thread developed, I dug in my heels on this anti-gadget thing, and found myself in a position I wished I wasn’t defending.

    I started to come off as an anti-technology luddite. Well, obviously, that’s not the case. I’m fascinated by technology, and it permeates my life, just like it permeates the lives of pretty much everyone living in the first world in the 21st century. If you take the telephone, the television, or the family car for granted, technology has already permeated your life.

    So how is having a wired web pad categorically different from having a telephone? Well, it’s not, necessarily. However, humans are on the brink of taking technology over what I feel is a significant threshold. Right now, you can walk away from technology when you want to. I feel that before long, it will not be possible to walk away. Or, more likely, it will simply not occur to people to walk away. People will take for granted the fact that we are all permanently wired, and that connectivity is just a fact of life, no matter where you are physically or geographically. It’s the crossing of that threshold that has me worried.

    But it was wrong of me to characterize myself as someone who is somehow aloof from, or remote from the pervasiveness of technology. I do find myself increasingly wary of it, but at the same time I am fascinated by it, and I do have gadget lust, and I do wonder where it’s all taking us, and I do follow news of the latest gadgets, etc.

    When I said in the interview that I felt that a lot of gadgets are “masturbatory,” I meant that a lot of stuff gets invented not to serve a pressing need, but because it’s possible, and because the market will bear it. Technology for technology’s sake is masturbatory, and I stand by that statement. But a lot of stuff is genuinely useful, too. I can’t imagine going back to life before PalmOS. On the other hand, I don’t like or want a Pilot with internet connectivity. Why not? Because I am disturbed by this trend toward ubiquitous connectivity. Of course, I’ll probably eventually get used to it, and who knows, maybe someday I’ll find myself wanting a web pad.

    See what I mean? I embody contradictions. So who doesn’t? I suspect that a lot of people feel conflicted about this whole “I.P. on Everything” movement.

    A lot of people here have seemed upset that I would say anything against Be in a public place. Well, I didn’t say anything against Be. I said that I thought a lot of gadgets that people drool over are unnecessary and self-indulgent. That’s a statement that applies equally to every hardware and software vendor playing in the appliance and gadget fields, not just Be.

    But I was more bothered by the accusations because they imply that I’m somehow beholden to Be, and shouldn’t be able to speak my mind freely. First of all, that’s absurd — I speak positively of Be most of the time because I feel positively about almost everything they’ve created. But I will not be obliged to be their shill just because that’s what people expect of me. When people say things like, “Be careful what you say in public — people put a lot of stock in your words,” I become very resentful. I will not dilute my opinions just so others can see through rose-colored glasses. People can do the research, form their own opinions, make up their own minds. All of this is moot because I didn’t say anything against Be in the piece… just wanted to get this off my chest.

    Anyway, enough wind from me for one night. I just felt the need to confess that I have not suddenly become a neo-luddite, and that I feel conflicted both about Be’s strategy and about the whole appliance revolution. I am fascinated by the evolution of technology, but I also watch it with a cautious eye. I don’t think I’m alone in feeling conflicted over this stuff.

  40. Anonymous Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    Great interview, Scot

    It is important for BeOS users, even important “spokespeople”, to talk rationally about BeOS, its advantages, and its limitations. There is nothing in your interview that should get anyone upset, even when you point out some unfortunate realities. This is *not* a religion.

    As far as the webpad issue is concerned, it might be cool for people who use computers *only* to surf the net, and thus reduce the amount of time spent in front of a conventional monitor. I would think of a Qubit as being analogous to a wireless phone. On the other hand, if your job requires you to spend all your time at a computer, a webpad is probably the last thing you want.

    Regarding Adamation and Personal Studio 2.0 coming out first on Windows and the BeOS version coming “later”, about the worst that could be said is that it isn’t exactly a vote of support for BeOS. OTOH, I’d rather have your company make some money off Windows users and survive than remain BeOS-exclusive and go belly up. It is just like Be deciding that BeIA must be a higher priority than BeOS if the company is to survive.

    When Personal Studio 2.0 is released on both platforms, I would love for an impartial reviewer to compare performance under Windows and BeOS.

  41. LeftTurn Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 11:18:03 AM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    I’m not disappointed by Adamation. They have invested heavily into BeOS, but they need to survive as a company and make money as well. I don’t have a problem with them doing cross development on Windows, as it brings more cash flow to the company. In the end, the BeOS version may be delayed like alot of other apps out there because the APIs the programs work from aren’t even out to the public yet! I’m just glad they are sticking it out with BeOS as I love PS.

  42. LeftTurn Says:

    In Response To DrB @ 12/24/2000 01:21:50 AM

    Re: why is everyone so updset?

    I’m married, but don’t really need a webpad. I don’t need to be connected to the internet everywhere I go.
    And for the record, to me, belly button rings, studs, or whatever, are a big turn-off. Yech! :)

  43. LeftTurn Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    Re: I embody contradictions

    I, for one, enjoy your honesty and integrity Scot.
    If everybody were to say it like it is, there’d be alot less problems in the world today, IMHO. Keep up the good work.

    Your impressions on technology follow mine as well, along with alot of other people. Alot of gadgets aren’t really useful and I don’t buy them unless I have a use for it.

    This may sound strange, but I wonder about all these wireless signals becoming more concentrated in the home and around us. What new forms of cancer may this bring? What are the long term health effects? I’m just curious, but it’s one aspect that isn’t looked at very carefully. Just something to think about.

    At the same time, I do love new geeky toys…

  44. DrB Says:

    In Response To LeftTurn @ 12/24/2000 11:29:14 AM

    Re: why is everyone so updset?

    That’s all right LeftTurn, I still respect you, even if your not a pierced freak like me. heheh

    MERRY XMAS and HAPPY CHANUKAH!!

  45. David Bruce Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    web pads

    I agree you may not want to buy a web pad, but that doesn’t mean you may not want to use one. I think such devices might be very handy in hotel rooms for business travelers or on airliners.

    The bottom line is that none of us really know if we will have a legitimate use for these things until we get our hands on them and see if they serve a real need (or want, at least). I hope you would at least be willing to try out a Qubit when it becomes available and see what you think.

  46. LeftTurn Says:

    In Response To David Bruce @ 12/25/2000 00:29:23 AM

    Re: web pads

    If it’s convenient (and free), I’ll definitely try one. Always like to test things out just to see. I try to keep an open mind, but always ask will it be useful for what I need?

  47. WattsM Says:

    In Response To grovel @ 12/23/2000 7:03:34 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    I’m going to run a word processor on a web pad? And type on what? None of the web pads I’ve seen have a real keyboard. A little image of a keyboard I can type on the touch-sensitive screen is fine for taking a few notes, but it’s not fine for *writing.* The abuse I dole out to cheap keyboards is probably unusual–when I moved to PC clones from the TRS-80 Model 4 (which had a remarkably good ALPS-built mechanical switch keyboard) I burned through three cheap keyboards in under a year before I finally broke down and bought an IBM brand PS/2 keyboard. But anyone who’s been around computers long enough to remember PCs with “flat keyboards” like the Atari 400 knows that hating them is not unusual at all. They suck lemons. Rotten lemons. (A lot of computer users have grown used to soft keyboards and don’t like the IBM Selectric-style “hard click” keys now, but a lot of ergonomic research went into those clackety keys!)

    …but, even so, the point remains. If you take a web pad and put a keyboard on it good enough for someone to write on, then depending on the design you’ve chosen, you’ve either just made a laptop that ride the IA bandwagon or you’ve reincarnated the TRS-80 Model 100. (Which, admittedly, might not be a bad thing if one could pull it off.)

    The idea of the remote-run applications has potential, although I suspect down the road what we’ll end up seeing is more of a component-based architecture following the browser plug-in model. There will be editing plug-ins as well as display plug-ins. Essentially, the plug-ins will be the applications, but they’ll have moved forward to a document-centric model rather than a program-centric one. The input technology is still going to have to be appropriate to the task, though–it goes hand-in-hand with the output concerns you mentioned. (I suspect the output concerns, and perhaps some input concerns in special cases, will be addressed with something like Bluetooth: when you want to print you’ll simply go to a printer and the pad, or laptop, will make a wireless connection transparently.)

    And, in passing, I suspect when you can pick up a magazine-sized device, probably there *will* be games for it long before anyone attempts productivity-oriented tasks that aren’t net-centric….

  48. WattsM Says:

    In Response To IAmWhoIHam @ 12/23/2000 10:24:01 AM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Quite frankly, if you think “wireless devices with touch screens” will suddenly make people who have no interest in email and the web now become great net surfers, you’ve never actually talked to a real, live technophobe. Maybe no computer magazine pundit has, either. These are people who are frustrated by computers, hate being forced to get email and have trouble figuring out what icons and links to “press” on a web page to make the computer do things. They may not even be clear on what the difference between the web and email is. I’ve watched people repeatedly get confused between the input field for a “search” function at the top of a web page and the input field right above that–the one in the browser for the URL.

    These are HCI (human-computer interface) issues, and education issues, and to a large degree personal preference issues. Nobody NEEDS a WebPad to read a book or the New York Times in bed, or USA Today at breakfast: they need something that gives them access to that content. Can you do that with a WebPad? Sure. Can you do it with an iBook and an AirPort card? You bet. Can you do it with a thinline Sony Vaio and a Ricochet card? Absolutely. Can you do it… get ready for it… with a physical book, a physical copy of the New York Times, and a physical copy of USA Today? Why, golly gee! It seems like you can!

    You are looking at the market like a technophile. Your entire argument hinges on the belief that people who don’t want to be bothered to learn how to set their own VCR clocks would embrace the web if only they can do it from a lightweight LCD tablet they can carry into their garden. BZZZT!

    Hammy Boy, you need to get over your absolute insistence that everyone MUST want a WebPad. YOU are the target market: a computer-savvy person who wants a wireless device that lets him do internet tasks with the same level of functionality as a PC, but without the expense and weight of a laptop. Great! YOU ARE NOT EVERYONE. Many people would rather have the laptop. Some technophobes, if they decide to bite the bullet, will get an iBook and an AirPort card. And millions of people, technophobes and technophiles alike, will decide that for the time being they still prefer the user interface of the actual book and the actual newspaper.

    And you know what? WebPads can be successful anyway!

    So stop preaching hellfire and brimstone to me, Scot and anyone else who ISN’T in that target market. ‘Kay?

  49. ViPir14 Says:

    In Response To WattsM @ 12/25/2000 5:48:28 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Kudos. I completely agree. Just because someone wants a hand-held Web device, doesn’t mean everyone will want one. And on the other side of the coin, just because someone else prefers the physical newsprint to the E-news version, doesn’t mean everyone will want one. It is all about individual prefrence; all about individuality. If someone doesn’t really care about reading the latest news, getting extra sports stats on a game, or reading a book, all through an intenet appliance, that is their choice. Doesn’t mean they’re evil, and they need to be converted to the “better choice”. Same thing the other way around - If someone wanted to get the latest, updated news, etc… through an IA, again, it’s their choice.
    Bottom line is, take everything you read with a grain of salt. Everyone has their own, individual tastes. Just accept someone else’s opinions for what they are, simply someone’s opinion. That’s what makes us human - having our own opinions. Don’t think that your opinion is the only option.

  50. Craig Mitchell Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    Re: I embody contradictions– hey that’s okay!!!

    Scot,

    It is always refreshing to hear someone’s honest comments and that’s what I felt what i was reading when i read the original review.

    I liken this whole situation to the pager/cell phone evolution. When pagers first came out they were used only by a few people mostly in buisness and many people refused to be “chained” to one 24 hours a day.

    Cell phones were seen as elite extravagances at this time… a popular refrain being “why in the world would you need to call someone from the grocery store?!”

    As prices came down and they became more common people saw more and more uses for both and they have gained wide spread acceptance.

    I see the webpad/appliance market following the same route and we are in the pre-pager stage right now.

    best,

    Craig

  51. tpv Says:

    In Response To mario @ 12/23/2000 2:39:06 PM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    It seems entirely reasonable to me.
    Since PS 1.5 is already out for BeOS, it makes perfect sense to make the next release on Windows, and then BeOS.

    Sure Windows users get 2.0 first, but BeOS users got 1.5 long ago.

    PS 2.0 will come to BeOS and I’m sure it will perform wonderfully, but in the meantime you have to make do with v1.5
    That sounds fine to me.

  52. h_ank Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    Re: I embody contradictions

    I’d like to through my support behind Scott Hacker for stating his honest opinion, standing by it and for not wanting every new toy, just because it is a new toy.
    I personally can’t wait to get a web pad. I want one because I will be on the Internet one way or another. Right now I spend hours in front of a computer at work, then I go home and spend more time surfing. I look forward to the option of doing the same thing but with more freedom as to where I do it.
    If I’m going to spend hours surfing, I’d like to choose where I do it from. My deck, couch, bed… These aren’t options right now, and the webpads should be much less expensive than an Aeron Chair!
    http://www.hermanmiller.com

  53. Troy Banther Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 5:50:25 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    Hello all,

    I am one of several system administrators at a local college. I’ve been working with computers since I started with them in the Marine Corps at MCB Pendleton. Along the way, I’ve worked with a broad range of systems and platforms.

    Now enter BeOS. SWEET! Not exactly a professional - but that is my idea of the OS. Nary a system crash or freeze. No rebooting after a driver - just restart. Graphics and sound that fly even on my home-built 300MHz AMD at home.

    I respect the opinions of those individuals who have worked with this OS for years, but I believe that little “true” effort was made to evangelize it or get it into the educational market.

    For example, distributing free disks to students, staff, and faculty at universities and colleges. Gobe (A product that reminds me of the WriteNow and several other nice and fast apps on Macs) should develop a non-trial, fully-functional, lite-version word processor to go with the BeOS personal edition.

    MicroSloth has been pumping the business and general computer-user population for years. The only product that I like out of all their bloat is NT Server and WS. This is only because it is stable for what I need to do and MS is the only thing the college I work for wants on their computers (Except for an old Novell 3.12 dog that I keep alive for a small network that almost pre-dates the college itself).

    BeOS screams from the getgo. Apps are small and mostly free or reasonable enough. Be should reconsider their position to scrap this OS.

    Well, enough of my thoughts.

  54. Marc Peters Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 5:52:17 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    Blah, I’m glad for what Scott said. Not because I agree with his stated opinion, but because I absolutely can’t stand it when I see a zealot from “X Brand O.S.” preach how great their Operating System is regardless of what they do.

    Scott stated that the WebPad didn’t interest him. The statement was given as an opinion and he backed them up with valid reasons from his viewpoint. A lot more damage would be done if Mr. Hacker put on a pair of rose colored glasses and said he thought the the WebPad looked fantastic and proceeded to spit out the companies sales pitch. People see through that you see.

    Scott Hacker has contributed a great deal to the BeOS community, perhaps even more than you “IamWhoIAm” and he is entitled to his opinion.

  55. Tika (Andrea Berg) Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 7:12:37 PM

    Re: I’m a bit disappointed w/Adamation

    Well if this is unstructured excuse me at 06am but I guess I just felt like ranting ;)

    First of all I want to say that you, Scott, do lots of good for the BeOS community (do as in present tense, continuing) :)

    All this *whinewhine you hate Be you think IAs suck Adamation kills BeOS support*….

    I’ve heard it all before, on a different OS that I _still_ love, called OS/2 (and no Scott, it’s _not_ dead, the old IBM bugger hangs on as eComStation).

    Anyway, in the OS/2 community Stardock decided to start selling Windows versions of their apps, and suddenly lots of their old trusty customers turned their backs on them as “traitors” and well.. things derailed pretty heavy, personal feelings, discussion wars… lots of hurt people and IBM didn’t seem to care.

    Be _cares_! Be issued a a statement that they will continue with BeOS. When you read their Job offers they want people to help bring Java to BeIA _and_ BeOS (see, they specifically said BeOS).
    They make coloumns with Be Programming tips (for free!), they update BeOS, they make new stuff availiable, they update it when bugs appear _very quickly_ (baron FTP anyone? ;)
    They want BeOS themselves, it’s the OS for development of BeIA (now isn’t that just what a MediaOS is cool for? Development of Media and Internet Appliances?)…

    As to Adamation releasing Windows version first, then BeOS edition. When I read your URL _this_ caught my eye (cut from the webpage):

    “Registered users of personalStudio for BeOS will be entitled to a free cross-grade to the Windows version of personalStudio when it becomes available. In fact, our ultimate intent is to get personalStudio into stores on CDs which contain versions of personalStudio for all currently supported platforms. In other words, purchasing one copy of personalStudio will entitle you to use it on any platform. ”

    That is _good_! It’s difficult to sell and live on _only_ BeOS applications because admit it, the Windows world is larger, mixing and giving you licence for the product regardless of whether you run it in Windows or BeOS… I can see lots of potentials here.

    And hey, look at this from another angle.. A copy of FreeBe on the Adamation CD, LICENCED Adamation for BeOS on the CD… BeOS mentioned in the manual… I can see how this would attract even MORE BeOS people who want to check out that new BeOS stuff the manual goes on about…
    Then they see the manual say “In BeOS, you can list all movies which contains Mom, brother and Buffy the cat in 2secs.. Do this: …. (This is only availiable in the BeOS version)”

    That is a _good_ thing too! ;)

  56. DJMaytag Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:05:29 PM

    Re: BeOS love it or leave it.

    “Ewww. Wouldn’t you rather have a newspaper in your hand?”

    No. read the e-papers and e-zines and save trees… :)

    Books are another story though, I’d still probably prefer the real thing to an e-book

    “You really want more stats than they give you on TV?”

    Scot, I assume you’re not a sports nut like myself and some others. I’d gladly take more detailed info than the overview given on TV.

  57. Kevin Wilkinson Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 2:48:31 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    HA! You to, huh? I do most of the reading I do on the Visor in the can. If I’m not reading, I’m playing (cringe) Solitaire.

  58. Kevin Wilkinson Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/22/2000 6:00:46 PM

    Re: He doesn’t want a webpad?

    HOORAY. Keep it up. One Hot-Sync a day is more than enough.

  59. DLazlo Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/24/2000 01:41:57 AM

    Re: I embody contradictions

    Scott has very good points on “going over the threshold”. It’s something very disconcerting. I’m all for using a wise mix of old and new technology.

    I love all kinds of gadgets and mechanisms, check them out whenever I can. However I heat my home with a nice efficient wood-burning furnace and solar heat. I repair or rebuild, or just plain invent, the things I have if possible rather than just toss it and go buy a new one.

    The new tech stuff coming out does have it’s uses though. You will soon be able to power your home or business with fuel cell technology, much cleaner and it lessen your dependance on the “grid”.
    Wireless communication is a good addition to this, just not when it’s used for it’s own sake but when there is a real value such as need or because it uses less resources than the alternatives.
    With a little thought for the future, we can pick and choose from all this “Amazing” new technology and find what is “realisticly” useful. The Earth is a closed system and we can use technology to improve the quality of life for everyone, not just a handfull.

  60. Ruprect Says:

    In Response To LeftTurn @ 12/24/2000 11:37:26 AM

    cancer and the genome

    First of all, Scott I agree with literally all of your thoughts. And a great read, they were.

    On carcinogous signals, haven’t you heard, LeftTurn? The human genome has been cracked. A cure for cancer is just around the corner! So chat all you want on that PDA/webpad. We’ll whip up a panacea in no time!

  61. Ruprect Says:

    In Response To Scot Hacker @ 12/23/2000 2:13:45 PM

    PersonalStudio and the BeOS media server

    Hey, Scott what’s the word on PersonalStudio using Be’s media server for v2.0? I was kinda surprised you guys didn’t use it for the first version, but I think you hinted at why in your article. Hardware support and drivers weren’t available?

    Still, it seems odd to me that the media OS isn’t being utilized like it was intended for a heavy duty media application.

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