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Haiku R1 Alpha3 is now released

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Posted by:scottmc on Monday, 20 Jun, 2011 @ 9:37 AM
 
Haiku

It took a bit longer than expected, but Haiku R1 Alpha3 has now been released. To see what’s new and improved in R1 Alpha 3 had on over and read the R1 Alpha3 release notes
To download, you can grab it from a mirror, or you can donate over $10US and get a Commemorative CD. Congrats to all who helped make this happen.



Learn Haiku Programming

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Posted by:Yez on Monday, 02 Aug, 2010 @ 6:56 AM
 
Haiku

The first book about Haiku is now available. ‘Learning to Program with Haiku‘ by long time community member Jon Yoder (aka Darkwyrm) is now available. The book is modestly priced at $25 and is aimed at beginning programmers working on Haiku. A copy will be purchased and reviewed by BeGroovy in the near future.



Haiku releases their second Alpha, on the way to R1.

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Posted by:scottmc on Sunday, 09 May, 2010 @ 10:04 PM
 
Haiku

With this latest Alpha, Haiku now has introduced basic WiFi support with WEP encryption, and a spiffy new web browser based on WebKit called Web Positive. It also sports many more bug fixes and other improvements over Alpha1 which was released September 14th, 2009. There’s also the new locale kit which allows localization/translation. For those who had issues with USB mass storage performance, you’ll be happy to see this is working much better in this new release. So what are you waiting for, head over and Get Haiku now.



Haiku gets 7 students for Google Summer of Code 2010

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Posted by:scottmc on Monday, 26 Apr, 2010 @ 12:07 PM
 
Haiku

Google announced today the accepted students for Google Summer of Code 2010. Haiku gets 7 students this year. This is Haiku’s 4th year in the GSoC, in 2007 they had 8 students, in 2008 they had 5 students and in 2009 they had 6 students. Among this years projects are x86-64 support, IPv6, Media Player/ Media Kit improvements, LKL-Haiku-FSD, Network Services Kit, improved EXT3 File System support and Taking the new Haiku Layout Management API public. Let’s join in welcoming this year’s selected students.

Lucian Adrian: lkl-haiku-fsd: Haiku file system drivers for any Linux supported file system
Atis Elsts: IPv6 implementation for Haiku
Janito Vaqueiro Ferreira Filho: Implement ext3 support for Haiku
Christopher Humphries: Media Player, media kits improvements
Christophe Huriaux: Creating Services Kit core elements
Nathan Mentley: x86_64 port
Alex Wilson: Taking the Haiku Layout API public

Here’s a Blog posting from BGA about his recent Google summer of Code, and Haiku talks at SCaLE8x.



Money Well Spent

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Posted by:Yez on Tuesday, 09 Mar, 2010 @ 9:05 AM
 
Haiku

Two weeks ago the Haiku Project mentioned that they were hiring developers to get things done on Haiku.  Their first hire was Stippi and he said he wanted to work on the Webkit port and the native web browser for Haiku.  Stippi has given us an update and how far he has gotten with WebPositive and it is amazing. At the moment, we have a working web browser.  As Stippi continues to work on it, we will have a fully functional, modern web browser for the OS we just can’t get enough of.



The Google Summer Of Code Is Here!

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Posted by:Yez on Monday, 08 Mar, 2010 @ 9:46 PM
 
Haiku

Now is the time for all good coding students to make some money for what you enjoy doing.  Everything you need to know is over on the Haiku website, on this page in particular.  Whether you are interested in being a mentor or a student, it is a great opportunity to help Haiku reach that elusive Beta and R1 and beyond.



Haiku gains “Stack and Tile” interface

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Posted by:scottmc on Wednesday, 28 Oct, 2009 @ 1:20 PM
 
Haiku

We saw the videos from the University of Aukland, and then got to try out the patches, but now the Stack and Tile code has been added to Haiku as of r33814. It allows you to stack any window onto another window or windows, or you can tile windows into groups, or do both at the same time. It may still be a bit buggy, but now that it is in the tree, it can more easily be worked on and debugged. As always if you find any bugs that aren’t already reported, be sure to file a new trac ticket for them. After using these new features you may just wonder how you managed without them. If you like having tabs in your browser, imagine having windows stacked that you can tab between.



Haiku Showing Off in Florida

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Posted by:Yez on Monday, 26 Oct, 2009 @ 9:10 PM
 
Haiku

This past weekend Ryan Leavengood took the time to represent Haiku and the Haiku Community at the Florida Linux Show.  You can read his blog post here.  Not only did he do a great job of getting the Haiku word out, he also has some great “what to do to have a better conference experience” tips.  Thanks for taking the time to evangelize Haiku Ryan!



Darkwyrm Manning The Table

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Posted by:Yez on Tuesday, 29 Sep, 2009 @ 9:21 AM
 
Haiku

Ohio Linux Fest was this past weekend and Haiku was represented by none other than long time community member Darkwyrm.  Everything went well and you can read about all the antics in his blog post.  With the alpha release, it appears that Haiku is beginning to gain some traction in the world!



Haiku Podcast #18

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Posted by:Yez on Sunday, 20 Sep, 2009 @ 10:43 PM
 
Haiku

Haiku Podcast #18 is now available for you viewing pleasure.  This podcast features 55 minutes of Haiku information brought to you by Urias McCullough and Matt Madia, TheNerd and Sikosis.  Head on over to HaikuPodcast.com and enjoy the great work they have put together.



Haiku R1 Alpha1 is now out!

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Posted by:scottmc on Sunday, 13 Sep, 2009 @ 9:55 PM
 
Haiku

After many years of development, there is now a first alpha release of Haiku. This release is mostly aimed at developers, but many will be checking it out to see just how far the project has come. So head on over to http://www.haiku-os.org and grab your copy, burn it to CD and mark it with September 14th, 2009. Give it a try out and come back and post your comments in our forums here. Congrats to all who were involved in making this possible, from those early developers who kicked off the project, to the ones who’ve just joined recently and everyone in between, and all the non-developers who’ve also pitched in to help out where they can. They have also done a refresh on the web site and it looks great.
Be sure to read the Welcome link on the desktop, lots of good info in there.



Haiku Alpha1 just days away

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Posted by:scottmc on Tuesday, 08 Sep, 2009 @ 10:28 AM
 
Haiku

Work on Haiku has been progressing at a fast pace this past few weeks. They did a feature freeze on August 23rd and have been working on bug fixes since then. There’s been some minor features added mostly to improve the live CD experience. That’s right, there will be an .iso and it can be used either as a LiveCD or as a Haiku install CD. There’s been daily alpha builds and tons of fixes and a handful of regressions. There’s also many testers in the mix checking each day and reporting back their findings, with many of the regressions being fixed that same day. Most of the OptionalPackages have now been rebuilt/refreshed, with only a few of those remaining to be done. It still looks like they are on track for the projected September 14th release.



Casual Code Sprint Yields Great Results

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Posted by:Yez on Monday, 03 Aug, 2009 @ 7:53 AM
 
Haiku

Last week a number of the Haiku top developers got together for an informal code sprint.  They also decided that Haiku is pretty much ready for an Alpha release so we should expect that any day now.  You can read about all the details in this report from Stephan.



Haiku Webkit Port Not Complete But Patches Being Committed

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Posted by:Yez on Friday, 17 Jul, 2009 @ 7:29 AM
 
Haiku

Ryan Leavengood has blogged about the progress being made on the Haiku Webkit port that he and GSoCer Maxime Simon are making.  With Haiku patches making it into the Webkit Repository, the community is that much closer to having its own native web browser.  The webkit is the foundation that a native Haiku web browser will be built on.  The progress made so far has put down a great foundation to build on.



More Fresh Developers For Haiku

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Posted by:Yez on Sunday, 17 May, 2009 @ 8:01 AM
 
HaikuSoftware

The Haiku Code Drive for 2009 is on!  Haiku will sponsor the code drive and pay students $2500 to complete Haiku based projects.  These students and projects are in addition to those that are participating in the Google Summer of Code.  What does this mean for the Haiku community?  By the end of the summer, we will be much closer to the elusive Haiku R1 and may gain a couple new long-term developers.



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Bryce Groff

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Posted by:scottmc on Wednesday, 13 May, 2009 @ 10:04 PM
 
Haiku

Here’s another one of our interviews with the Haiku Google Summer of Code students, this time with Bryce Groff, who was one of the six who were selected for this years GSoC for Haiku.

Tell us about yourself
Sure. My name is Bryce Groff. I am finishing my undergraduate at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Computer Science and minoring in Geography. I have had an interest in computers from an early age, and first started programming in basic. In high school I learned VB.Net and started to learn C. I really started to get into programming once I started college and have been working on learning new things since.

How did you hear of GSoC?
I have been following Haiku for a long time now and have seen the GSoC program through the Haiku web site. For the last two years I thought it would be an interesting program to be a part of and I felt confident that this year I was up to the task. So I submitted my application and the rest is history.

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?
I remember waiting for BeOS r5 when I was in eighth grade. When I finally got to download BeOS I was blown away by how simple and easy to use the operating system was and how well it ran on my computer at the time (I think it was a celeron). When Be went under I was sad that the operating system was going away. After a while I started to find bits of information about a new operating system called OpenBeOS and started to follow the project and have been watching it ever since. Its great to see Haiku in the state that it is, and it can only get better.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
Like I said I have been watching Haiku for a long time now. I think I found it through OSNews or possibly freeos.com.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
I used BeOS for a while back around 99-2000 and it was my operating system about half time.

Tell us about your selected project
My project is to finish the implementation of the disk_device system. Basically this means that at the end of the summer we should have a good interface for partition schemes and the Intel system in particular. This means that we should have a good partition tool that can create a new partition map on the disk.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?
I think that the organization did a good job of laying out what was expected. The community always seems to welcome people who want to help out with the project.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
No.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?
No, I think that everyone who has been involved has communicated well and has given updates promptly.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?
Haiku was the only project that I submitted an application to. I was interested in finishing the Cairo backend but they did not apply to the program this year.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
I think the more the merrier. It seems like everyone would like for the Code Drive to happen.

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?
Finding solutions to problems has always been fun for me. I have worked in construction and I draw a lot of parallels between programming and construction. In both fields you are given the basic tools and materials needed to finish the project. So when I decided to go to get a degree I thought that Computer Science would be a good field to get into. Not to mention that I have spent a large amount of time tinkering with computers.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
I enjoy working with C++ and C# at the moment. The University of Hawaii uses Java as its intro language and that was interesting for a couple of semesters as well. Most of my own projects use C or C++ though.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what
was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

I worked on adding a line number display to StyledEdit. You can take a look at ticket #2623 and see the patch. I did not have enough time to really make it as nice as it could have been and unfortunately was taken out of the tree :( . The code was nice to work with. The Haiku team really stresses code style, which has forced me to think about style a lot more in my own code. At the moment there are not open tickets I am working on, however I still would like to help with the Cairo backend.

Bryce



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Chico Chen

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Posted by:scottmc on Sunday, 10 May, 2009 @ 10:06 PM
 
Haiku

Here’s the third in our series of interviews with the students who applied for this year’s Google Summer of Code for Haiku, this time with Chico Chen.

Tell us about yourself
I am a first-year graduate student in Graduate University of
Chinese Academy of Sciences now. My Major is basic software and
Trusted Computing. I love writing some codes in my blog to remember or
to share. I can read, write and speak English correctly enough to
understand and be understood. I cooperate with others easily, also
have coordination skills, teamwork spirit. I am skilled in use of C,
Java, UML, especially C++.

How did you hear of GSoC?
from open source

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?
I don’t know much about the future of Haiku. But it is an interesting
project. The code is not complex and the lines of code is not huge.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
from GSoC

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
No

What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?
The media kit. No, just I don’t know much about media. The unknown
part is very interesting.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is there another area that interests you?
You can recommend me some areas, and then I decide to choose one of them or not.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?

No.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
The big problem is I should adjust to develop project in linux and
other os. I used xp and vs to develop projects in the past.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

Haiku should give some suggestion after someone committing his/her
project proposal.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?

the Database Module of scilab.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
Yes

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?

My major. And I find I am suit for this major.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
c++

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2322
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2117
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2413
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/3635
patch : http://dev.haiku-os.org/ticket/2891
And I have opened many tickets.

some of code need to be reconstructed.
No other plan.



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Henri Vettenranta

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Posted by:scottmc on Thursday, 07 May, 2009 @ 8:21 AM
 
Haiku

Tell us about yourself

I’m Henri Vettenranta, a 20-year-old IT student at Tampere University of
Technology. I’ve been fiddling with computers for longer than I’ve even
had one at home, starting on the computers on my mother’s work place
when she had to work on some weekends.

How did you hear of GSoC?

I originally heard of GSoC years ago when it was first introduced, but
couldn’t apply back then because I was too young. This spring I saw the
announcement in the topic of #haiku again and decided to apply.

What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?

I see Haiku as the continuation of BeOS, which is still ahead of other
operating systems in some ways, even though it hasn’t been developed in
nearly a decade. I’d also say Haiku will have the best support for
developing, supporting and running commercial, proprietary software
among the open-source desktop-oriented operating systems.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?

While trying out BeOS I was disappointed with what had happened to it
and Be, so I went looking for options. Haiku was already back then the
only alive project trying to reimplement the Be API, so I was naturally
quite interested in it.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?

Yes, although like probably many others, I only tried BeOS first-hand
years after the demise of Be. If I’m not completely mistaken it was
around when Haiku got a working app_server, so that would be early 2005.
I ran BeOS as my primary desktop operating systems for quite a few
months back then, but eventually switched to Ubuntu mostly due to lack
of recent Adobe Flash.

What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?

I applied to work on an application updater. It interests me because
there currently is nothing quite like that on any operating system: the
updaters in Windows and Mac OS X can only update first-party software,
and Linux package managers and the like aren’t really cut out for a
collection of software from several third-party suppliers, either.

Haiku’s attributes are also a neat way to implement such a system
without having to maintain a separate database of installed
applications: when you install an application, it will automatically be
picked up by the updater when it uses an index to find all the
applications on a system, and when you remove the application file, its
entry will of course be removed from the file system index. Much of the
metadata such as the installed version and the location where to look
for updates can also be neatly kept part of the application executable
as attributes.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is there another area that interests you?

The partition table editor sounded pretty interesting, but I see there’s
already someone working on that.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community, individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you as an applying student?

I can’t think of any improvements. The application template was good, it
quickly got you going with writing the application.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?

No, I don’t think so.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

No, no bigger flaws in how Haiku handled GSoC, and if there were smaller
ones, I’ve already forgotten them.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with GSoC? If so which ones?

No, I only applied for Haiku

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?

Yes it does sound interesting.

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?

I’ve always been fascinated by computers, and it was nice to see my own
code running and doing things on the machine. I’m not sure if I’d call
myself a programmer, though, since I haven’t had time to do many bigger
things unfortunately.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?

As I said I haven’t had much time for programming, but from playing with
it a little, Python does seem nice. As far as I know, Bethon, the Python
bindings for the Be API, isn’t quite up to the task on current versions
of Haiku and Python, so for Haiku software the choice would be C++.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to try working on other open items?

Yes I did work on my own patch in #2389 to make an alternative
implementation to rename the title of a tab in the terminal application.
For the most part the code seemed quite easy to understand, even though
it was virtually uncommented. There were also some small style issues
like the header files having inconsistent indentation, but generally the
code seemed pretty good.

It was quite nice to work on that, I may look for other small items in
the future to work on as time permits.


Henri Vettenranta
HeTo



Haiku Google Summer of Code Interview with Smita Vijayakumar

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Posted by:scottmc on Monday, 04 May, 2009 @ 11:21 AM
 
Haiku

Various BeOS/Haiku related news sites are going to be hosting interviews with some of the Google Summer of Code students who applied to work on Haiku. Here’s the interview we did with Smita Vijayakumar, who applied to work on adding IPv6 support to Haiku. Smita’s entry didn’t make the final six, but she’s hopeful that there might be another Haiku Code Drive this year.

How did you hear of GSoC?
Through a friend who worked for GSoC in 2008.


What convinced you that Haiku is a project worth working on?

I liked the idea list, and the development work. I have had past experience working on similar features.

How’d you first hear about Haiku?
Through the Google Summer of Code list of organizations.

Do you have any experience with BeOS or Zeta?
No


What did you apply to work on, why did that specifically interest you?

I applied to work on implementing IPv6 support for Haiku.
It specifically interested me since I have 4 years’ development experience on network stacks.

If you do not get the chance to work on the project you applied for is
there another area that interests you?

I am open to good development opportunities that will involve learning for me.

Is there anything Haiku (as an organization, website, community,
individuals, any facet of Haiku) could’ve done differently to help you
as an applying student?

For supplying patches, there should be a set of bugs assigned to applicants, and mentors should evaluate quality of patches for the same bug fixed.

Was anything overly complicated or discouraging?
:) No. I personally did not fix a bug, since all bugs reported were application level bugs, and there was none which was a system-level bug.

Do you have any suggestions or constructive criticism for the people
involved with Haiku’s participation in GSoC?

Better feedback on proposals will really help. I understand there are many applicants, but if there is something specific missing in a proposal, and is highlighted, that helps to improve future applications.

Besides Haiku, did you apply to any of the other orgs involved with
GSoC? If so which ones?

I applied to Google Chromium and Asterisk.

Would you be interested in a possible Haiku Code Drive?
Yes!

What influenced your decision to become a programmer?
I have always been passionate about programming, especially low-level programming, since it involves a lot of intricate logic and design.

What is/are your language(s) of choice?
C/C++ programming.

Did you work on any open Haiku tickets, and if so which ones and what
was your overall impression on the code you worked on? Any plans to
try working on other open items?

Though I did not work on any ticket, I did write up a few lines of code to test my idea in the proposal. This code never did find its way onto the code branch.
I personally feel the system-level code (especially handling of ICMP and the division between network layers) can be more modularized. I found some functionalities to be spread out.; This increases the chances of bugs.



Six Students for Haiku via GSOC 2009

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Posted by:Yez on Tuesday, 21 Apr, 2009 @ 8:43 AM
 
Haiku

Haiku will get the help of six students from the Google Summer of Code experience this year.  The students will be working on items from a native web browser for Haiku to porting Haiku over to the ARM process.  The ARM processor port is of GREAT interest to us here at BeGroovy because we see a huge potential for being one of the few operating systems that will be available for the next generation of ARM based netbooks coming out at the end of this year.  Please, welcome our energetic young developers to the Haiku community!  Read more over at the Haiku website.



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